Who Gives the Biggest Sign-on Bonus: Army, Navy, Marines or Air Force?

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Join the Military Eligibility Requirements. You may enlist if you have a permanent visa for the US. Choosing the military as a career also has its benefits retirement and medical and challenges. A successful stint in the Military depends heavily on trust, but it relies on discipline.

Sign-on bonuses are an incentive for new recruits to fill valuable positions in the military. The amount of these bonuses differs depending on a number of factors, including which branch of the military you apply to, the career you choose, and for how long you enlist.
Joining the Military Are you ready to enlist? Do you want to serve your country? Use these military tips and resources to learn more about the enlistment process, commissioning programs, military entrance processing station (MEPS), the ASVAB test, basic training, technical training and other things the recruiter didn't tell you.
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Join the Military Requirements for Joining the U.S. Military. To join the enlisted ranks, in general you must: Be a U.S. citizen or Green Card holder. Non-citizens must speak, read, and write English fluently. Sign up. Your email address Sign up. Official Guide to Government Information and Services.
1. Self Motivation

If you're considering joining the military, here are the top 10 things you should know before you step into a recruiters office. Marines Can Pocket Up to $90K in New Re-Up Bonuses.

Aside from providing the training and education you need to be in service to the United States, the Navy fosters personal development and leads to excellent career opportunities. To join, you'll need to meet several qualifications and make a commitment to service. Read on to learn what you need to know to get started. Be in the right age range. To enlist in the Navy, you must be at least 17 but under 40 years of age. If you're 17 years old, you will need your parents permission to enlist, otherwise, you can wait until you turn 18 to self apply.

To become an officer, you must be at least 19 and no older than The age requirements vary according to specific positions; for example, some officer positions may require that you be older than 19 to apply. Meet the citizenship qualifications. In order to enlist in the Navy, you must either be a US citizen or have a permanent residence visa.

To become an officer, you must be a US citizen. Have fewer than three dependents. Single parents of one child may enlist, but they must complete a special application process.

Prove that you can meet your financial obligations. While the Navy doesn't require that you be free of debt to enlist, you may be asked to prove that you're in a position to make payments on time. If you have bad credit, be able to show that you're on the path to improving it.

Pass a drug and alcohol test. The Navy has a "zero tolerance policy" for drug and alcohol abuse, and you'll be required to pass a urine test to show that your body is clear of both substances.

You will also have to answer questions regarding past use or abuse of drugs and alcohol. Meet the requirements for legal and moral standards.

The Navy seeks to enlist only those with high moral character. Your traffic record, criminal record, legal record, and character history will all be subject to review before you're accepted into the Navy.

Meet the educational requirements for your desired position. Decide whether you want to be an enlisted member or an officer. This distinction determines what type of job you'll do within the Navy and how much education you're required to have. No matter what, you'll need a high school diploma or GED. To be an Enlisted member of the Navy, you don't need a college degree.

You must be qualified mentally, morally, and medically. You will be given a chance to take a practice test called the EST Enlisted Screening Test to test your mental ability.

Next you will undergo a medical exam to determine that you are physically eligible. Both of these examinations will be used to determine what specialized fields you are qualified to work in. Such areas include aviation, nuclear, electronics, medicine or other general area of work in the Navy. Most of enlisted Navy jobs are very demanding and they generally have lower salaries than officers.

Enlisted members have to go through 8 weeks of boot camp 8 weeks versus 13 weeks for OCS. Officers get saluted, get paid more, and have more benefits, including officer club privileges, officer's mess on carrier ships, better housing, and other such benefits.

Once you've determined that you meet the necessary requirements, get in touch with a recruiter, either in person or online. If you're not yet sure whether you want to join the Navy, you can still contact a recruiter, no strings attached, to ask questions. When you speak with a recruiter, be sure to ask about the commitment that will be required for the type of service you want to do.

Discuss the specific requirements of your field of interest, including the education you'll need. The recruiter will provide you with an application, or direct you to one that can be found online.

When you submit your application, you'll continue working with a recruiter to set up a plan for enlisting.

Decide what position you want to apply for. The Navy is rich with career options for recruits, who can choose to pursue a career in engineering, construction, education, the arts, health, information technology, special operations, and so on.

Deciding early on what path you want to pursue can help you achieve your goals in the Navy more quickly. Recruits who wish to become officers who serve in managerial positions in the Navy, will need to undergo more training than recruits who will serve as enlisted sailors, the workforce of the Navy. The Navy often pays for undergraduate and graduate education to help members pursue jobs and careers. Sign up and make a service commitment. When you're ready to commit and you've passed the necessary medical and mental exams, you'll fill out paperwork and receive instructions regarding the first year of training.

If you're signing on as an enlisted sailor, you will typically commit to at least four years of service; if you're signing on for an officer position, the commitment is three to five years. Complete the first year of service. During the first year, you'll undergo primary training and begin learning about the job you wish you pursue.

You'll spend time getting acquainted with the rules and culture of the Navy. Complete your terms of service. As a member of the Navy, you may or may not spend time deployed on a ship. In some cases you may spend up to 6 months at a time away from your home base. At the same time, you'll work a specific job and gain expertise in your chosen field. Rise through the ranks. Many people in the Navy are eligible for a promotion after just 9 months of active duty.

As you fulfill your service commitment, opportunities for promotion and advancement are often plentiful. SSN card, birth certificate, other IDs, transcripts from high school and college, to name a few examples to consider.

The military will screen you medically, but if you have any prior surgeries, broken bones, or major illnesses, they need to know about it and file the proper paperwork as some of these may require medical waivers.

Yes, you may be able to get a waiver. Know the ailments that are disqualifying — check here for more info. Make copies of all your records when you submit them. Learn how to take this test. Your score on this test can determine where you will live and what you will be doing in the military. You will undergo a background investigation to ensure there are no disqualifying events in your history.

Criminal behavior is a typical disqualifier. An omission on your part may be detrimental to progressing further due to a perceived character issue. A successful stint in the Military depends heavily on trust. A successful stint in the Military depends heavily on trust, but it relies on discipline.

That discipline starts in earnest the minute a recruit arrives at Basic Training. A higher discipline requires acceptance that all feedback is positive and the key to achieving the personal discipline necessary to succeed in the Military.

Learning to be led is the most important lesson in learning to lead. Often, enlisting in the Military takes the newly minted Soldier, Sailor, Airman or Marine far from family, loved ones and their geographical roots. It means that you will have travel and professional experiences that will shape the way you see the world, at a very early age. The military experience will shape your life through the development of self-reliance and relationships that sometimes last a lifetime.

You will learn how to react quickly to high stress situations, and you will rely on your training to help others through traumatic events. There are many educational opportunities available in the military from occupational training courses to full college tuition paid in undergraduate and graduate programs.

Choosing the military as a career also has its benefits retirement and medical and challenges. Do your homework before seeing a recruiter. This is your future profession and possibly even your career. Take the time to educate yourself on all the pro's and con's and opportunities you have in front of you. It is your life — make it a good one. Join the Military Eligibility Requirements.

Follow this five-step process to join the U.S. Navy, laid out for you in simple, easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions. If you are ready to serve your country and pursue a career in America's Navy. Brushing Up on Military Missions. While it’s sometimes hard to tell due to each branch of the military having mixed forces, each one has a specific mission. What You Should Ask the Recruiter. Navy Federal Credit Union is an armed forces bank serving the Navy, Army, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard, veterans, DoD & their families. Join now! Skip to Main Content. Sign up for online banking. Branches & ATMs.

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